Asia is in crisis mode. Europe, or so it appears, is in recovery mode. In Asia we are set to see a re-run of 1997, or so they say, when Asia suffered one very nasty crash. In Europe years of pain are set to pay dividends, or once again so they say. Yet, look beneath the surface and things look different. Asia today is nothing like Asia in 1997. Parts of Europe on the other hand do.

Déjà vu. We all get it from time to time, but presumably it is an illusion. It has been theorised that we may get that feeling of that having done or said something before, because our subconscious can perceive something before our conscious.
Déjà vu when applied to Asia may be an illusion too.

At the moment many are trying to draw a lesson from the 1990s. In 1994, the US Federal Reserve began a cycle of tightening monetary policy. As US interest rates increased, money flowed from the so-called tiger economies of South East Asia into the US. The 1997 Asian crisis resulted. The IMF stepped in. Some countries, that had previously seemed to be on an unstoppable road to riches, suffered a very nasty recession/depression.

Many fear a repeat of this today. The Fed is set to tighten. The biggest victim to date has been India. Brazil, Turkey and Indonesia have also seen sharp currency losses. Indonesia’s central bank has responded by increasing rates four times in just a few months.
Don’t forget, however, that despite the severity of the 1997 crisis, within a short time frame output across South East Asia had passed the pre-1997 peak. It will be like that again. Indeed Indonesia, perhaps along with the Philippines, is one of the most interesting territories in the world right now – from an investor’s point of view that is. This time around savings rates are higher in South East Asia, while external debt – especially in the case of Indonesia, the Philippines and India – is relatively modest.

Contrast this with what is happening in the euro area, where many countries in the region are facing the tyranny of a fixed exchange rate, which is causing the recession/depression to drag on and on.

But the latest Purchasing Managers’ (PMIs) Indices relating to Europe look promising. The PMI for Spain hit a 29 month high, for Italy it was at a 27 month high. Ireland’s PMI was at a 9 month high. For Greece the story is sort of better still; the PMI is now at a 44 month high.

However, the Greek PMI still points to recession. In Spain, Italy and Ireland the growth looks only modest. Just remember that these countries have massive levels of unemployment – especially in Spain and Greece. For them to cut government debt to the levels required, they have to impose austerity for years and years.

And just consider what might happen, if the markets expect an even higher return on the money they lent to troubled Europe as rates rise in the US.

The markets are panicking over Asia. They should perhaps be looking towards Europe.

© Investment & Business News 2013