There have been times in the past when the markets got it into their collective head that it was time for buying, even though there were good reasons to think it was really a time for panicking. Take 2007: in that year, the Dow Jones passed a new all-time high, and the FTSE 100 came close to passing its all-time high. These promising stock market peaks occurred after the run on Northern Rock; after the phrase ‘credit crunch’ crept into popular parlance. Back then the markets were in the mood for interpreting all news - good or bad - as if it was a reason to buy. Their logic went like this: if the news was bad that meant interest rates might fall, so buy; if the news was good, they bought because, well… because the the news was good.

There have been times since when it felt a bit like that all over again, but this year, it has been rather odd.

The Dow Jones began 2013 with a score of 13,104, peaked at 15,409 on May 28 (the previous all-time high was 14,164 set in 2007). The index then fell back, falling to under 15,000 and at the time of writing stands at 15,135.

For the FTSE 100 things were a lot more volatile. The index began 2013 with a reading of 5,897, peaked on May 22 with a reading of 6,804 (against an all-time high of 6,930 set on December 30 1999), before falling back to 6,029 on June 24, and at the time of writing is at 15,135.

In Japan things have been more even extreme. With the Nikkei 225 rising from 10,401 on January 1, to 15,627 on May 22 and then 12,834 a week or so ago.

It is not hard to find an explanation but it is harder to find one that makes sense.

Because the news out of the US has been so good, the Fed is now talking about reining-in QE, and upping interest rates in 2015.

The markets do not like it.

The jury is out on how much QE has had to do with equities surging so high. QE has driven asset prices upwards, but then valuations to earnings, especially in the UK, do not look excessive.

One of the worries is that while the US economy may boom, the more indebted regions of the world simply cannot afford higher interest rates.

The Bank of England and the ECB recently went out of their way to emphasise that they have no plans to tighten monetary policy and that what they do is not dictated by the Fed.

But, supposing interest rates rise in the US, and money therefore flows into the US from the rest of the world. In response and to stop currencies falling too sharply against the dollar, we may see other central banks up rates. To make matters worse, the Central Bank in China seems to be tightening monetary policy. This may be a good thing for China, and indeed for the global economy in the long term, but for much of the world the timing is not good.

Some have had a nasty attack of déjà vu. When the Fed upped rates in 2004, one eventual consequence was money flooding out of South East Asia into the US, which led to the Asian crisis of 1997.

But then again there are differences this time. In Asia, especially among the so-called ASEAN countries of Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines and Thailand, internal savings are much higher and the countries are less reliant on overseas credit.

Across the world some countries are more vulnerable than others. Brazil may be the most vulnerable of the BRICS; Turkey seems to have high exposure, and worryingly - given the political situation - so does Egypt.

Many countries in emerging Europe seem exposed, as do the PIIGs – of course, and so do Sweden and the Netherlands. Household debt and house prices are high in Canada and Australia, and then there is the UK. See: Is that a sword of Damocles hanging over the UK housing market? 

Interest rates seem set to rise in the US, and for other reasons they may rise worldwide. See: The Great Reset 


This is down to good news, and is largely positive, but for some countries, companies and people, the news is not so good - not at all.

 

© Investment & Business News 2013